Take a d.school class

“Students take on real-world projects in our classes and labs, giving them practice and confidence in their innovation process.”

Classes 2013-2014

If you are Stanford graduate student, please see below for our current class offerings for 2013-2014.

For spring offerings we encourage you to attend the d.school’s info session on Tuesday February 11, 2014 from 12:00-1:00pm to learn more about the d.school and our classes.

If you’re not a student and can’t get to Palo Alto, or are a student but can’t wait for next quarter to try out design thinking, check out our Virtual Crash Course, which is a 90-minute introductory experience in design thinking. This page also has resources to help you continue your learning journey, wherever you are.

 

Spring Quarter 2014

Tackle Big Challenges

Business Collaboration to Promote a Sustainable Food System
Collaborating with the Future: Launching Large Scale Sustainable Transformations
d.compress: Designing Calm (Class canceled for spring quarter.)
Design @ Intersection of Science, Technology, and Entrepreneurship
Design for Extreme Affordability (2 Qtrs)
Design Garage: A Deep Dive in Design Thinking (2 Qtrs)
Designing Liberation Technologies
Design Thinking for Public Policy Innovators
From Play to Innovation
Game Design: Making Fun
Give Big or Go Home
Innovations in Education
LaunchPad: Design and Launch Your Product or Service
ReDesigning Theater: Interactive Art & Performance Design (2 Qtrs)

Hone Your Skills

Creative Gym: A Design Thinking Skills Studio
Creativity and Innovation
Fail Faster

Pop-Up Classes

21st Century Schools Challenge 
A d.school Sampler
Agile Feds: A Design Sprint
Building Innovative Brands
The Decay of Digital Things
Design for the Weary
Designing Your Leadership Legacy
d.nature: Exploration in Biologically Inspired Design
EngagED: Redesigning the Classroom Experience
From Maps to Meaning
The Future of Participation: Games, Storytelling, Music
Get Smart: Making Complicated Information Simple
Giving Tuesdays for #GivingTuesday
Parks, Plazas, Public Spaces: Designing for Communities at Play
Redesigning Criminal Justice
The River of Life: Designing for Flow

Classes Taught in Past Years

Browse classes taught in past years. These classes may be taught again in the future.

Creativity and Innovation
d.compress: Designing Calm
d.health: Design Thinking for Better Health
d.leadership: Design Leadership in Context
d.media: Designing Media that Matters
Design Thinking Bootcamp: Experiences in Innovation and Design
d.science: Design for Science
Designing for Sustainable Abundance
Designing the Way Up: Disruptive Solutions for Poverty in America
FEED the Change
Foundations of Design for Design Thinkers
Founder’s Studio: Guerrilla Tactics for Entrepreneurs
Prototyping and Rapid Experimentation Lab
Rebooting Government with Design Thinking
SparkTruck: Designing Mobile Interventions for Education
StoryViz: Storytelling and Visual Communication
The Designer in Society
Understanding Superfans and Their Heroes

Pop-Up Classes

Bridging the Technology/Customer Divide in Big Data
Chocolate Head-Space
DESIGN.EDU
Design Sprints for Startups
Design Thinking Basic Training
Design Thinking for Schools
Design Thinking Tonic – First Shot: People & Spaces
Design Your Startup
Designing Life, Essentially
Designing Empathy Based Organizations
Designing Organizations
Flail or Flourish: The SuperPower of Resilience
Game Design: Making Fun
Give Big or Go Home
Heartistry: Design Thinking from an Artist’s Perspective
How To Be a Cyborg
Human-Centered Sustainability
Improv and Design
Interactions with a Human Touch
Know Your Humans: Designing Effective User Research
Law by Design: Making Law People-Friendly
Leadership through Flow: Boxing, Dance, and Philosophy
Look Mom, I Hacked the Refrigerator! New Approaches to Designing and Prototyping Systems
Notebook Neophyte to Whiteboard Warrior
Prototyping Systems
ReDesigning the Hospital Birth Experience
Social Brands
Sex & Design
Subjective Obsessive Beauty: Amplifying Your Creative Practice
Taming Tempation: Design for Self-Control
The Consumer Mind and Behavior Design
Topics in Design Research: d.think Outside the d.school
Where Did You Go, Olympia Snowe?
Whizbang! Toy Invention

 

Independent Study Projects

d.school-OpenIDEO Partnership: Unlocking Creative Confidence in Young People 

Take a d.school class

Design Thinking for Public Policy Innovators

Fri 10:00am – 1:00pm, Studio 1

PUBLPOL 240, - 4 Units Letter Grade or Pass/Fail

Launched 2013

The ability of the political system and public institutions to tackle the big problems facing modern societies challenges today’s policy makers to demonstrate fresh thinking and innovative ideas. This class will explore how the methods and mindsets of design thinking – in particular its emphasis on a human-centered approach – can offer new insights and help lead to policy innovations.

This class is a hybrid: a combination of traditional seminar-based instruction with the project-based design challenges found at the d.school. You will focus on a topical policy challenge: poverty and inequality in America, with a focus on the experience of children six and younger. To gain empathy and insight and drive your project work you will engage with individuals and families in the San Francisco Bay Area facing disadvantage; for content depth and context you will engage directly with leading subject experts in a blend of lecture, readings, and short assignments.

You must be able to commit to team collaboration that happens outside of class while the design projects are in full swing, including trips off-campus. This class will be fun, meaningful, challenging, and somewhat experimental. At the conclusion you will present your ideas directly to senior policy makers from the Bay Area and New York City, and you will create rich media materials that can be shared with those working on solutions to poverty across the US and beyond. (See The Girl Effect videos produced by the Nike Foundation for an example of what this might look like.)

Apply Enrollment limited to 24 students.

Application due March 19 at 11:59pm.

Apply here: http://bit.ly/policyinnovators2014

Teaching Team

Sarah Stein Greenberg, d.school

Steve Hilton, Public Policy

David Janka, d.school,

Erik Olesund, MS&E

Questions sarah@dschool.stanford.edu

Back to class list
Design Thinking for Public Policy Innovators

Business Collaboration to Promote a Sustainable Food System

Collaborate, Innovate, Accelerate: Scaling our Local Food Economy

Tue/Thu 1:30p – 3:00p
GSB Co-Lab
GSBGEN 337
3 units
Letter Grade or Pass/Fail
Launching 2014

This goal of this class is to redesign our food system through project-based, experiential education and entrepreneurship. Projects will focus on food justice, sustainable food and farming technology and disruptive models of production and distribution. The class will scale change by providing creative spaces and resources for students, faculty, and community partners to learn and apply design thinking to real-world opportunities in the food system.

Apply
Enrollment limited to 24 students. Non-GSB student applications are due by 11:59p, March 7th. Apply here: http://bit.ly/sustainablefood2014

Teaching Team
Matt Rothe, dschool
Sarah Soule, Graduate School of Business
Erik Olesund, Management Science & Engineering

Questions
matt@dschool.stanford.edu

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@Stanford Studio

Re-imagine the Future Stanford Experience

Winter 2014
Tue/Thu 10:00a – 12:00p
Studio 1
ME 247C
4 Units
Credit/No Credit
Launched 2012

Re-imagine the future Stanford experience. @Stanford Studio is an opportunity for students to design, develop, execute, and iterate immersive prototypes that allow experimentation into many facets of the future student experience. Students enrolled in @Stanford Studio in winter quarter will be responsible for running quarter-long independent experiments.

Apply
Winter quarter is an advanced studio for continuing students. New students please apply as a way to indicate your interest. Opportunities for involvement in the @Stanford project for new students will arise, though not in the format of a traditional class.

Teaching Team
Carissa Carter, d.school
David Kelley, d.school, ME Design, IDEO
Scott Doorley, d.school

Questions
carissa.carter@gmail.com

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Collaborating With the Future

Crafting Interventions for Massive Change

Spring 2014
Mon/Wed 10:00a – 11:50a
Studio 1
ENVRES 380/PSYCH 380
3 – 4 Units
Letter Grade
Launched 2009

We are entering an era marked by pressing global issues such as the environmental crisis, unstable economies, and uncertain resource availability. In this class, you’ll learn a toolkit incorporating design thinking, behavior change, diffusion theory, and strategies for scale to address critically urgent issues that are complex and immense in scale. Working in multi-disciplinary teams, you will utilize this toolkit to design a transformative intervention, one that responds to a specific challenge sponsored by a partner organization in industry or the public sector. In previous years, projects have ranged from scaled solar lighting across rural India to designing a Village Loan and Savings program for adolescent women. We encourage students to use this class as a launching pad for real initiatives.

We believe that influential change leaders of the future will need to craft and launch initiatives that simultaneously create human, societal, economic, and environmental value. In this class, you’ll face a massive challenge and as a leader, learn to seamlessly balance vision, creativity, ambiguity, and a sense of scale. Come join us.

To learn more about the class and the teaching team visit http://www.largescaletransformation.com

Apply
Enrollment limited to 24 graduate students (Especially qualified/motivated Seniors will be considered.) Application due MAR. 1 at 11:59pm.  Apply here: http://bit.ly/futurecollab2014

Admitted students will need to attend a design thinking workshop on March 8 and 9, 2014.

Teaching Team
Banny Banerjee, Mechanical Engineering
Baba Shiv, Graduate School of Business
Anja Svetina Nabergoj, University of Ljubljana
Jackie del Castillo, ChangeLabs

Questions
banny@stanford.edu

Back to class list
Collaborating With the Future

Creativity and Innovation

Becoming Mindful Innovators

Winter 2014
Tue/Thu 9:00a – 10:50a
Studio 2
MS&E 277
3 – 4 Units
Letter Grade
Launched 2001

This course will lead students in the experiential exploration of different factors that stimulate and inhibit creativity and innovation in individuals, teams, and organizations. Understanding these factors will catalyze a change in students’ behavior, towards becoming mindful innovators who find unexpected solutions to big and small problems. Each session will offer the opportunity to explore design thinking and its underlying mindsets: adopting an empathic lens for problem definition, creative confidence, bias towards action, building to think, divergent and convergent thinking, and failing forward. Students will work in teams to take on real-world innovation challenges.

Apply
Enrollment limited. (Please note that priority will be given to graduate students.) Admission by application: fill out an online application by Friday, Dec. 6 and come to the d.school (Studio 2) on Thursday Dec. 5, 6:00p – 8:00p. Admission decisions will be communicated by Friday, Dec. 13. Apply online here: http://bit.ly/creativitywinter2014

Teaching Team
Frederik G. Pferdt, Google
Leticia Britos Cavagnaro, d.school
Melissa Pelochino, d.school

Questions
britos@stanford.edu

Back to class list
Creativity and Innovation

FEED the Change

ReDesigning the Food System

Tu/Th 3:15p – 5:05p
Studio 2
MS&E 187
2 – 3 Units
Letter Grade

FEED the Change is a 2-3 unit introductory course to design and systems thinking targeted at upperclass undergraduate students. Through a series of diverse experiences, students will both learn and apply the process of human-centered design to real-world projects in our regional food shed.  Students will also develop knowledge and tools for analyzing complex systems, as well as how to work effectively in teams. Our teaching philosophy is that the most rewarding educational experiences are those in which students alternate between learning, doing, and teaching.  In this spirit, students willwork on projects of real consequence and will have an opportunity to teach design thinking to other students, our project collaborators, and those for whom we’re designing solutions.

This class is offered through the Food Entrepreneurship Education & Design (FEED) Collaborative, which combines experiential learning in human-centered design, systems thinking and social entrepreneurship with long-term collaboration among thought leaders in the food system. Our intent is to develop the innovative capacity of students and, in turn, to facilitate innovations that address both the current and future challenges of our food system.

Apply
Apply at http://feedcollaborative.org/classes/
Enrollment limited to 20.

Teaching Team
Debra Dunn, d.school
Matt Rothe, d.school

Questions
ddunn@stanford.edu, matt@dschool.stanford.edu

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FEED the Change

d.compress: Designing Calm

Mindful Designers Create Mindful Experiences

Canceled Spring 2014.

Mon 1:15p – 4:05p
Studio 1
EDUC 328A/ CS 377D
2-3 Units
Letter Grade
Launched 2011

Interactive products that create calm in our lives? Now there’s an idea. In this project-based course, students will design prototypes that aim to create a calm state of mind as users work, travel, communicate, and play. Sample student projects will include calming approaches to email, wake-up routines, exercise, and driving in traffic.

Given the impact that designers are having on global society, it is imperative that the designers themselves learn how and when to include mindfulness, compassion, and self-regulation techniques in the design process itself. This course will give students the opportunity to develop greater self-awareness.

Stress hinders our performance and experience of life. In-class and homework activities will help students theoretically understand and personally experience calming practices in three domains: physiology, cognition, and emotion.

This course will draw upon Stanford’s engineers, psychologists, entrepreneurs, thinkers, and tinkerers to transform reflective insights into compelling user experiences.

Apply
Canceled for spring 2014.

Teaching Team
Neema Moraveji, Stanford Calming Technology Lab
Pablo Paredes, HCI at UC Berkeley

Questions
neema@stanford.edu

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d.compress: Designing Calm

d.health: Design Thinking for Better Health

Winter 2014
Tue/Thu 3:15p – 5:05p
Concept Car
ME423
3 Units
Letter Grade
Launched 2011

In the US 75% of medical expenditures are for illnesses that are lifestyle related (i.e. diabetes, heart disease). If patients could change their lifestyles, medical problems could be avoided and a healthier and happier life achieved.

Using design thinking in teams, this class will delve into this challenge. The class will have a personal project as well as a small and a large team project with multiple milestones. Students will work in the field, and present in class multiple times.

Apply
Enrollment limited to 20 graduate students. Applications due December 6. Apply here: http://bit.ly/dhealth2014

Teaching Team
Denny Boyle, IDEO
Dr. Alan Glaserhoff MD, Stanford Coordinated Care Clinic
Dr. Ann Lindsay MD, Stanford Coordinated Care Clinic
Jason Oscar Randolph, School of Education

Questions
dennis@ideo.com

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d.health: Design Thinking for Better Health

d.leadership: Design Leadership in Context

Leading Innovation in Context

Winter 2014
Mon/Wed/Fri 10:00a – 11:50a
Studio 1
ME 368
1 – 3 Units
Letter Grade
Launched 2010

d.Leadership is a course that teaches the coaching and leadership skills needed to drive good design process in groups. d.leaders will work on real projects driving design thinking projects within organizations, and gain real world skills as they experiment with their leadership style while coaching innovation projects.

Take this course if you are inspired by past design classes and want skills to lead innovative work beyond Stanford. Preference given to students who have taken other Design Group or d.school classes.

Background: The d.school “flips” ~800 students/year to believe in the power of design thinking. Many of these folks encounter cultural roadblocks in the organizations they join after leaving Stanford. We believe there’s an opportunity to equip a few of our best and brightest with the skills they need. Not only to engage the design thinking process themselves, but also to teach and to lead others beyond Stanford. This is the first advanced-level design thinking course the d.school has offered. As such, the only prerequisite is ROCKING another d.school course.

Apply
Enrollment limited to 24 graduate students. Application due 9:00a on Friday November 22; select applicants will be interviewed December 2-3 for a seat in the course. Apply here: http://bit.ly/dleaders2014

Teaching Team
Jeremy Utley, d.school
Perry Klebahn, d.school & ME Design
Bob Sutton, Management Science & Engineering
Kathryn Segovia, d.school
Adam Selzer, d.school

Questions
dleadership@dschool.stanford.edu

Back to class list
d.leadership: Design Leadership in Context

Design @ Intersection of Science, Technology, and Entrepreneurship

Turn Your Research into a Product or Service

Monday April 7, 21, May 5, 19, and June 2
5:30p – 8:00p
Studio 2
ME 350A
1 Unit
Credit/No Credit
Launching 2014

This 1 credit class is for graduate students who are passionate about turning their research into a product or service. We are looking for students from the sciences, engineering, or mathematics, or students who have business acumen or start-up experience. If you want to get out of your lab, away from your machine, form a team and start to design your future come join us.

We’ll meet every other week over the quarter in five self-contained workshops where students will join multiple interdisciplinary teams and explore the practical applications of fellow students’ innovations, experience team formation and collaboration, and begin to explore product design. Advisors from industry and academia will mentor student teams.

This class will also prepare you to apply to a more intensive 3 credit class next year where teams will push further using a human centered approach to product discovery and continue to explore the practical applications of their research. While helpful, this class is is a standalone class will not be a pre-requisite for the second course.

Apply
Enrollment limited to 40 graduate students. Application due March 31 at 11:59pm. Apply here: http://bit.ly/designx2014

Teaching Team
Dave Blakely, IDEO
Jon Feiber, d.school and Mohr Davidow Ventures
Sarah Soule, Graduate School of Business

Questions
jdfeiber@stanford.edu and dblakely@dschool.stanford.edu

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d.media: Designing Media that Matters

Swipe, Search, Share. Create Meaningful Digital Experiences with a Positive Social Impact

Winter 2014
Wed 3:15p – 5:05p
Studio 1
ENGR 281
2 – 3 Units
Letter Grade or Credit/No Credit
Launched 2007

The combination of always-on smartphones, instant access to information and global social sharing is changing behavior and shifting cultural norms. How can we design digital experiences that make this change positive? Join the d.media team and find out! This course is project-based and hands-on. Three projects will explore visual design, interaction design and behavioral design all in the context of today’s technology landscape and in service of a socially positive user experience. See http://dmedia.stanford.edu

Apply
Enrollment limited to 24 graduate students. Application due January 3. Apply here: http://bit.ly/dmedia2014

Teaching Team
Dave Baggeroer, Blockboard, d.school
Enrique Allen, The Designer Fund, d.school
Scott Doorley, d.school
Ashish Goel, d.school

Questions
davebags@stanford.edu

Back to class list
d.media: Designing Media that Matters

Designing Liberation Technologies

Design Technology to Promote Development and Democracy

Mon/Wed 5:15p – 7:05p
Studio 1
CS 379L, POLISCI 337T, LAW 498
3-4 Units
Letter Grade
Launched 2009

Small interdisciplinary project teams will work with selected enterprises and NGOs in Kenya to design new technologies for promoting development and democracy. The focus for the students will be a quarter-long design project, taking advantage of the design process structures and methods that have been developed in the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford (d.school). Promising projects will be encouraged and supported to develop beyond the end of the academic course to turn the ideas into viable products and applications.

For the 2014 class we will be developing mobile applications in areas such as health, education and economic development, in conjunction with the University of Nairobi and corporate and NGO partners in Kenya. Collaboration with these groups will provide students with access to the settings for design and their needs and values will be the touchstone for measuring the success of the projects. Class sessions will include background and discussions on issues that contribute to and/or hinder social change through technology. Students will analyze case studies of interventions that have been attempted in a variety of social contexts—both success stories and striking failures.

Readings, speakers, and discussions will provide a technical grounding and will address political and cultural concerns, including the complexity of technology adoption in contexts outside of Western technology-advanced groups and cultures, the development of infrastructure, both technical and social, that is required as a basis for the successful adoption of new technologies, and the challenges of assessing the value of interventions in real social and political contexts.

We will send selected students from the course to do initial needfinding and collaboration development in Kenya during Spring Break before the course begins.

Apply
Enrollment limited to 16 students. Primarily graduate students. Applications due Friday, February 28 at 11:59p. Apply here: http://bit.ly/libtech2014

Teaching Team
Josh Cohen, Law, Political Science, and Philosophy
Sally Madsen, IDEO
Terry Winograd, Computer Science

Questions
winograd@cs.stanford.edu

Back to class list
Designing Liberation Technologies

From Play to Innovation

How to Bring Play from the Sandbox into your Career

Tue/Thu 1:15p – 3:05p
Studio 2
ENGR 280
2 – 4 Units
Letter Grade
Launched 2007

From Play to Innovation is a class focused on enhancing the innovation process with playfulness. We will investigate the human “state of play” to reach an understanding of its principle attributes and how important it is to creative thinking. We will explore play behavior, its development, and its biological basis. We will then apply those principles through design thinking to promote innovation in the corporate world. Students will work with real-world partners on design projects with widespread application.

Apply
Enrollment limited to 32 graduate students. Application due March 20. Apply here: http://bit.ly/play2014

Teaching Team
Brendan Boyle, IDEO
Elysa Fenenbock, Google
John Cassidy, Founder of Klutz
Stuart Brown, National Institute for Play
Stuart Thompson, Stanford Neuroscience

Questions
bboyle@stanford.edu

Back to class list
From Play to Innovation

Designing for Sustainable Abundance

A Radically Human Centered Approach to Sustainability in the Food System

Winter 2014
Tue/Thu 3:15p -5:05p
Studio 2
MS&E 289
3 – 4 Units
Letter Grade
Launched 2008

In this hands-on, team-based, multidisciplinary class we will tackle real design challenges in our regional food shed with a radically human-centered approach, increasing sustainability hand in hand with abundance. “DSA” is a graduate-level course focused on the intersection of design thinking and the existential questions facing our food system. Students will benefit from close interaction with the teaching team, support from project sponsors, and the varied perspectives of a wide range of guest speakers.

What students have said about Sustainable Abundance:

“Fantastic! You challenged us to step WAY outside our comfort zones and really look deeper. This skill is useful not only for school, but for life as well.”

“A mind-opening class and one I often talk about to others about the advantage of coming to Stanford.”

Designing for Sustainable Abundance is sponsored by the FEED Collaborative at Stanford – an ecosystem of innovation for solving the food system’s most confounding issues. More at http://www.feedcollaborative.org/

Apply
Enrollment limited to 25 students. Application due December 2. Apply here: http://bit.ly/sustainable2014

Teaching Team
Debra Dunn, d.school
Matt Rothe, d.school

Questions
ddunn@stanford.edu, matt@dschool.stanford.edu

Back to class list
Designing for Sustainable Abundance

Prototyping and Rapid Experimentation Lab

How to use Prototypes to Make Sure the Needs are Real and the Solution Works

Winter 2014
Wed 1:15p – 4:05p
Studio 2
MS&E 488
4 Units
Letter Grade
Launching 2014

In this course, you will gain a deeper understanding of the prototyping and user feedback parts of the design thinking process with a focus on rapid experimentation. In particular, we will explore prototyping and user feedback that happens in later stages of iteration when design ideas are somewhat gelled, but designers are still uncertain about whether the design will meet the need and evoke the response intended. We will introduce and generate creative ways to discover what users will do in the real world with the designs we envision. This class is for seasoned students who thoroughly understand the design thinking process or, more broadly, human-centered design and now want to focus on one later stage aspect of it in more depth.

Apply
Enrollment limited to 20 graduate and undergraduate students. Applications due December 4th. Apply here: http://bit.ly/protolab2014

Teaching Team
Pamela Hinds, MS&E
Julie Stanford, Sliced Bread Design

Questions
phinds@stanford.edu, julie@slicedbreaddesign.com

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Game Design: Making Fun

An exploration of games, gaming, and game design

Spring 2014
Tue/Thu 1:15p – 3:05p
Studio 1
TAPS 23
3 Units
Letter Grade
Launching 2014

This class is about using design thinking to create new games of any kind — live, digital, verbal, physical, turn-based, synchronous, narrative, strategic, luck based, skill based, educational, you name it. Make it, play it, test it, improve it.

Apply
Enrollment limited to 24 students. Freshmen and undergraduate students are encouraged to apply. Applications due March 1, 2014 at 11:59pm. Apply here: http://bit.ly/gamedesign2014

Teaching Team
Dan Klein, Theater and Performance Studies & Graduate School of Business
Mathias Crawford, Communication
Michael St. Clair, Theater and Performance Studies

Questions
kleinimp@stanford.edu

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Game Design: Making Fun

The Designer in Society

Personal Tools for a Satisfying and Creative Life

Winter 2014
Tue 1:15p – 4:05p
Studio 1
ME 315
3 Units
Credit/No Credit
Launched 2010

This class focuses on the individual and their psychological wellbeing. The class delves into how the student perceives themselves and their work, and how they might use design thinking to lead a more creative and committed life. Students read a book a week and then engage in exercises designed to unlock learnings.

Apply
Enrollment limited to 24 students. Apply on the first day of class.

Teaching Team
Bernie Roth, d.school
Jeremy Utley, d.school

Questions
bernie@dschool.stanford.edu

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The Designer in Society

Give Big or Go Home

Use human centered design to shape your giving, while also considering the roles of larger systems

Mon/Wed 3:15-5:05 pm
Studio 1
ME 290
3-4 Units
Credit/No-Credit

When individuals or organizations attempt to solve social problems by giving money, they often overlook the people at the center of the situation. The bigger the problem, the more removed the donors or funding institutions become from the human experience. You will learn how to use human centered design to shape your giving, while also considering the roles of larger systems. Students will learn design thinking methods, how to conceptualize a system in which you want to make a difference, and creative ways to think about financing change.

For this class, we will be partnering with TheDream.US Scholarship Program and the Omidyar Group.  TheDream.US is a national scholarship fund for undocumented immigrant youth who want to obtain a college education and give back to their communities.  The Omidyar Group is a philanthropic investment firm dedicated to creating opportunity for people to improve their lives.

Thanks to a generous grant from the Learning by Giving Foundation, students will also have $10,000 that they will collectively distribute during the class towards addressing the given design challenge.

Apply
Enrollment limited to 20 graduate and undergraduate students. Application deadline extended to March 31. Fill out the online application and attend the first day of class on March 31. Apply here: http://bit.ly/givebig2014

Teaching Team
Nadia Roumani, d.school & Stanford Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society
Lucy Bernholz, Stanford Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society

Questions
nadia@dschool.stanford.edu

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Give Big or Go Home

Innovations in Education

An Exploration of Designing New School Models

Spring 2014
Tue/Thu 4:15p – 6:05p
Studio 1
EDUC 338X
3 – 4 Units
Letter Grade or Credit/No Credit
Launched 2008

This quarter, you’re going to design the next generation of school models. Using the principles of user-centered, prototype-driven, iterative design, you will prototype learning environments and school models that explode our ideas of how to support transformative teaching and learning. Together we will investigate how student voice, parent participation, new staffing models, and organizational structures intersect with emergent technologies and child-centric pedagogies to create new visions for what school can be.

This class will be deeply interdisciplinary and is ideal for those wanting to play with business models, organizational design, experience design, and systems prototyping. It will also be exciting for folks curious how expertise in the domain intersects with creative skills for innovation. Projects will be done in partnership with leading innovators in the field.

Apply
Enrollment limited to 18 students. Admission by application. Applicants will be asked to attend a “Meet the Teaching Team” mixer on Monday, March 10, 5:30p – 6:30p in Studio 1 at the d.school. Applications due March 14. Admissions decisions will be made by March 21. Apply here: http://bit.ly/innoved2014

Teaching Team
Susie Wise, d.school
Sandy Speicher, Design for Learning, IDEO
Christine Ortiz, The Ampersand School

Questions
K12@dschool.stanford.edu

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Innovations in Education

Design Garage: A Deep Dive in Design Thinking

Team Up with Design Rock Stars and Choose Your Challenge

Winter & Spring 2014
Tue 6:00p – 9:00p
Design Loft (Building 610) Room 619
ME 316B/C
2 – 4 Units per Quarter
Letter Grade
Launched 2011

Design Garage is a class for anyone who wants the experience of developing a real product, service, or experience, using design thinking as the method, and utilizing the resources of the Loft, the graduate Design Studio, and the Masters students in the Design program. Projects range from the entrepreneurial to the socially conscious and are selected and driven by student teams. This is a two-quarter long commitment; a deep-dive into design process, radical collaboration, and making things real using a project-based learning format. This class provides a unique learning opportunity that includes an immersion into design culture (the Loft) and a thorough experience with rapid prototyping, ideation and need finding. Students will have the experience of working with an outside client/affiliate and making their project real, either through a market-based solution or through a socially-focused non-profit enterprise.

Apply
Enrollment limited to 40 students. There is a two quarter commitment. Applications closed.

Teaching Team
Bill Burnett, Graduate Program in Design
David Kelley, Graduate Program in Design and d.school
Nicole Kahn, IDEO

Questions
wburnett@stanford.edu

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Design for Extreme Affordability

Designing Products and Services for the Base of the Pyramid

Winter & Spring 2014
Mon/Wed 10:00a -11:45p;
Thu 7:00p – 9:00p
Studio 2
OIT333/334, ME206A/B
4 Units per Quarter
Letter Grade
Launched 2004

Design for Extreme Affordability is a two-quarter project course in which graduate students design comprehensive solutions to challenges faced by the world’s poor. Students learn design thinking and its specific application to problems in the developing world. Students work in multidisciplinary teams at the intersection of business, technology, and human values. All projects are done in close partnership with a variety of international organizations. These organizations host student fieldwork, facilitate the design development, and implement ideas after the class ends. Learn more at extreme.stanford.edu

Apply
Enrollment limited to 40. Two quarter commitment. Applications closed.

Teaching Team
Dave Beach, Mechanical Engineering Design Group
Jim Patell, Graduate School of Business
Julian Gorodsky, d.school
Stuart Coulson, d.school
Taylor Cone, d.school
Joan Dorsey, Graduate School of Business

Questions
extreme@dschool.stanford.edu

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Design for Extreme Affordability

LaunchPad: Design and Launch Your Product or Service

Zero to Revenue in Ten Weeks

Spring 2014
Tue/Thu 4:15p – 6:05p
Studio 2
ME 301
4 Units
Letter Grade or Credit/No Credit
Launched 2009

This is an intense course in product design and development offered to graduate students only (no exceptions). In just ten weeks, we will apply principles of design thinking to the real-life challenge of imagining, prototyping, testing and iterating, building, pricing, marketing, distributing and selling your product or service. You will work hard on both sides of your brain. You will experience the joy of success and the (passing) pain of failure along the way. This course is an excellent chance to practice design thinking in a demanding, fast-paced, results-oriented group with support from faculty and industry leaders.

This course may change your life. We will treat each team and idea as a real start-up, so the work will be intense. If you do not have a passionate and overwhelming urge to start a business or launch a product or service, this class will not be a fit.

Apply
Enrollment limited to 24 graduate students. Application is due by Feb 15, 2014 at 5:00pm. Apply here: http://bit.ly/launchpad2014 Seats will be assigned by March 1, 2014 for spring quarter.

You will be working in a team (you apply as an intact team), or alone on your product or service idea. You must submit a proposal (check d.school website Feb 1, 2014) and have the concept and your team approved to join the class. Your product can be a physical good or service, or an online or software-based product. Students are encouraged to select a product on their own. There will be office hours sessions with the teaching team in winter quarter (Wednesdays 5:00p – 6:30p at the d.school) to offer help if you need ideas or help to focus your proposal. Applicants are REQUIRED to come to at least one office hours session to meet the teaching team and discuss their start up.

Teaching Team
Perry Klebahn, d.school
Michael Dearing, d.school
Andrew Humphries, d.school

Questions
mdearing@stanford.edu, perryk@stanford.edu, andrew.humphries@dschool.stanford.edu

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LaunchPad: Design and Launch Your Product or Service

ReDesigning Theater: Interactive Art and Performance Design

Fill your toolbox with skills to transform your ideas into engaging public projects

Winter & Spring 2014
ME 289A/B
Launched 2012

Winter: Wed 1:15p – 3:05p
(Field trip on January 17th 9am-6pm)
Studio 1

2 Units
Letter Grade

Spring: Mon/Wed 1:15p – 3:05p
Studio 1
3-4 units
Letter Grade

This class is for those who want the experience of designing and creating interactive art and performance pieces for public audiences, using design thinking as the method, and supported by guest speakers, artist studio visits and needfinding trips to music festivals, museums and performances.

Drawing on the fields of design, art, performance, and engineering, each student will ideate, design, plan and lead a team to build an interactive art and/or performance piece to be showcased to audience of 5,000 at the Frost Music and Art Festival held on the Stanford campus on May, 17th 2014. Projects can range from interactive art to unconventional set design, and from site-specific sculpture to immersive performance.

This is a two-quarter long commitment during which students will first learn the design, planning, story boarding, budgeting, engineering, proposal creation and concept pitching of projects for applying for grants and presenting to funders. The second quarter will concentrate on prototyping, maquette making, testing, team forming, project management, creative leadership, construction, site installation and documentation. For more info: http://dschool.stanford.edu/redesigningtheater/class/

Apply
Enrollment limited to 35 graduate and undergraduate students. Applications close January 6. Apply here: http://bit.ly/theater2014

Teaching Team
Michael Sturtz, ME Design
Sasha Leitman, CCRMA

With special guests from: CCRMA, TAPS, Art and Engineering

Questions
msturtz@stanford.edu

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ReDesigning Theater: Interactive Art and Performance Design

Creative Gym: A Design Thinking Skills Studio

Increase Your Creative Capacity

Wed 1:15p – 3:05p
Studio 2
ME 366
1 Unit
Credit/No Credit
Launched 2009

Build your creative confidence and sharpen your design thinking skills. Train your intuition and expand the design context from which you operate every day. This experimental studio will introduce d.school students to fast-paced experiential exercises that lay the mental and physical foundation for a potent bias toward action, and a wider knowledge of the personal skills that expert design thinkers utilize in all phases of their process. Exercises will be offered by a number of the d.school’s most creatively confident design thinkers.

Apply
Enrollment limited to 24. To apply fill out the online application and come to the first day of class. Apply here: http://bit.ly/creativegym2014

Teaching Team
Grace Hawthorne, PAPER PUNK and d.school
Charlotte Burgess-Auburn, d.school
Scott Doorley, d.school

Questions
grace@dschool.stanford.edu

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Creative Gym: A Design Thinking Skills Studio

Creativity and Innovation

Every Problem is an Opportunity for a Creative Solution

Tue/Thu 10:00a – 11:50a
Studio 2
MS&E 277
3 – 4 Units
Letter Grade
Launched 2001

This ambitious course focuses on stimulating creativity in individuals and teams within organizations. We use experiential methods including case studies, workshops, field trips, and team design projects, supported by guest speakers and readings. The philosophy of the course is that every problem is an opportunity for a creative solution; and its goal is to help students identify individual and organizational factors that promote and inhibit creativity.

Apply
Enrollment limited to 40 students. To apply: 1. Sign up in Axess; 2. Fill out the online application here: http://bit.ly/creativityspring2014; 3. Come to the first day of class at the d.school. Applications close on April 1 at 5:00p.

Teaching Team
Tina Seelig, Stanford Technology Ventures Program
Elizabeth Weil, Andreessen Horowitz
Justin Ferrell, d.school
Rich Cox, Lime Design Associates

Questions
tseelig@stanford.edu

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Creativity and Innovation

Fail Faster

How to Navigate, Bounce Back, and Even Flourish From Failure

Spring 2014
Wed 4:15p – 6:05p
Studio 2
ME 379
1 Unit
Credit/No Credit
Launched 2012

Fail Faster will explore ways to: [1] become comfortable with uncertainty, [2] develop tools to navigate situations of failure, and [3] practice turning failures into opportunities. This quick-paced workshop will examine and exercise the psychological traits and the power of resilience through hands-on activities. Students will practice techniques and tools to help them navigate, bounce back, grow and even flourish in the face of their failures.

Apply
Limited Enrollment to 16 students. Applications due March 10, 2014. Apply here: http://bit.ly/failfaster2014

Teaching Team
Grace Hawthorne, Paper Punk and d.school
Guthrie Dolin, Nurun and d.school
Manish Saggar, PhD Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Questions
grace@dschool.stanford.edu

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Design Thinking for Schools

Monday Evenings + Saturday
January 27, February 3 & 10 5:15p – 7:15p
February 22 11:00a – 2:00p
Studio 2
0 Units

This new four week course will expose students to design thinking and give them an opportunity to learn more about how it can be applied in schools. Students will be broken up into teams, and will collaborate with individual high schools that are facing design challenges around school-based decisions, such as tardiness policy, school discipline, or implementing project-based learning. Students will get a unique view into the decisions that school leaders and school communities face, develop a range of innovative ideas and prototypes, and test those ideas directly with the schools. The course will also explore the degree to which design thinking in schools leads to solutions and ideas that prioritize the student voice and increase overall student engagement.

Teaching Team
Coe Leta Stafford, IDEO
Lindsay Wai, IDEO
Matt Haney, d.school
Pui Ling Tam, San Francisco Peer Resources

Apply
Enrollment limited to 25 students. Applications close January 7. Apply here: http://bit.ly/popappwinter2014

Questions
mhaney@dschool.stanford.edu

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Look Mom, I Hacked the Refrigerator!: New approaches to designing & prototyping systems

One Evening + Weekend Workshop
February 26, 6:00p – 9:00p
March 1, 10:00a – 4:00p

Studio 2
0 Units

In this new d.school pop-up class, we’ll use Noam, a new software prototyping platform, to power a design thinking-focused exploration of the process of integrated hardware and software prototyping. Together we’ll learn how to create awesome hardware-software prototypes, and ship some cool stuff!

Noam is a new tool built by designers at IDEO. Their point of view was to create versatile, powerful, simple, and flexible messaging platform to break down the barriers between existing prototyping platforms such as Arduino, Processing, Open Frameworks, Qt/QML, and JavaScript. The class will be powered by an alpha release of Noam, a key enabler of understanding and iterating on a prototype concept.  You’ll be among the first people in the world to be hacking on the platform.

If you’ve ever imagined prototyping a design challenge bigger than can be contained within a single tool, a system that requires communication and coordination between tools, or a data-driven system prototype, this class is for you! This class is open to anyone who’s interested in learning about cutting-edge prototyping techniques—you don’t need to be a CS major to participate!

Teaching Team
Diego Rodriguez, IDEO + d.school
John Lilly, Greylock Partners + d.school
with Noam design team from IDEO

Apply
Enrollment limited to 24 students. Applications close January 23. Apply here: http://bit.ly/popappwinter2014
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DESIGN.EDU

2 Evenings + 1 Saturday Workshop
Jan. 14, 21 6:00p – 9:00p
Jan. 25 10:00a – 2:00p
Studio 2
0 Credits

This pop-up will offer students an introduction to the d.school’s design thinking process with a focus on challenges in school learning environments. Likely topics: How might we redesign homework? How might we include student voice in radical new ways? How might we design the ultimate tech tool for high school?

Teaching Team
K12 Lab Network Collaborators:
Marcy Barton, Ventana School
Nicole Cerra, Design Tech High School
Ellen Deutscher, Central Middle School
Matt Haney, d.school
Christy Knott, Design Tech High School
Guido Kovalskys, d.school
Kim Jacobson, d.school
Petr Johanes, Learning Design & Technology
Ken Montgomery, Design Tech High School
Susie Wise, d.school

Apply
Enrollment limited to 60 students. Applications close January 7. Apply here: http://bit.ly/popappwinter2014

Questions
k12@dschool.stanford.edu

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Game Design: Making Fun

3 Tuesday Evenings
January 28, February 4 & 11
7:00p – 9:00p
Studio 2
0 Credits

This pop-up class is about using design thinking to create new games of any kind -— live, digital, verbal, physical, turn-based, synchronous, narrative, strategic, luck based, skill based, educational, you name it. Make it, play it, test it, improve it.

Teaching Team
Dan Klein, Theater and Performance Studies & Graduate School of Business
Mathias Crawford, Communications
Michael St.Claire, Theater and Performance Studies

Apply
Enrollment limited to 16 students. Applications close January 7. Apply here: http://bit.ly/popappwinter2014

Questions
kleinimp@dschool.stanford.edu

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Human-Centered Sustainability

3 Monday Evenings
January 27, February 3 & 10
7:00p – 9:00p
Studio 1
0 Credits

Conserve water. Recycle. Reduce energy. Protect the wildlife. Use less paper. Don’t litter.

These are behaviors we want to see in a more sustainable society. When people are asked to adopt these behaviors, they’re often left asking, “How? How do I conserve water, reduce energy, and protect wildlife?”

What’s more, calls to action are often framed as a moral imperative to “do less bad” for the collective good– which is often in tension with individual needs and aspirations.

There’s a huge opportunity to align these tensions and design for sustainability in ways that meet individual needs and create real collective benefits. In this pop-up class, we’ll explore how to make sustainability human-centered.

What are the overlaps between what people need in their everyday lives and what’s good for the world? Understanding these overlaps, how can we prompt sustainable behaviors in a way that everyone (not just environmentalists) can feel great about?

The class will consist of three 2-hour sessions, with design activities in between. In session 1, we’ll focus on understanding people’s needs and aspirations related to chosen sustainability topics. In session 2, we’ll design and run behavior change prototypes that address these needs. In session 3, we’ll share what we learned and discuss the larger implications for sustainability.

Teaching Team
Sally Madsen, IDEO
Steve Bishop, IDEO

Apply
Enrollment limited to 18 students. Applications close January 7. Apply here: http://bit.ly/popappwinter2014

Questions
smadsen@dschool.stanford.edu

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Know Your Humans: Designing Effective User Research

Wednesday Evenings
Feb. 12, 19 & 26
6:00p – 9:00p
Studio 1
0 Credits

Setting yourself up to design a delightful product or experience means starting with strong user research. Come learn how to do research that effectively informs user experience in this fun, interactive pop-up. We’ll get comfortable crafting questions, putting on our observational and analytical hats, and asking HOW and WHY. You will practice how to see and understand users’ small daily choices — the ones that other people might miss — to be able to design for and with those users. Students who take this class will be able to identify highly motivated users, practice keen observation skills, and gain insight into how to meaningfully impact the people they are designing for.

Teaching Team
Emily Goligosky, Mozilla Foundation
Steph Habif, Stanford Calming Technology Lab & d.school

Apply
Enrollment limited to 40 students. Applications close January 23. Apply here: http://bit.ly/popappwinter2014

Questions
sehabif@stanford.edu

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Law by Design: Making Law People-Friendly

Tuesday & Thursday Evenings
Jan. 21, 23, 30, Feb. 4 & 6
6:30p – 8:30p
Studio 1
1 Credit

Law isn’t typically thought of as a space for creativity or great human experiences, but this class sets out to change that.

In Law by Design, interdisciplinary teams of students will design a new generation of legal products — to help normal US consumers get in control of their legal situation: specifically, their end-of-life legal plan.

Though this process is important for protecting a person’s interests — and helping their loved ones once they’ve been incapacitated — many people don’t do it.

There has been little innovation in how people may establish end-of-life plans. The teams will have the opportunity to pioneer what ‘consumer law’ could be.

Law by Design will be a hands-on sprint to see how we can empower non-legal people with legal agency, using human-centered design.

Teaching Team
Margaret Hagan, d.school
Fred Leichter, d.school
Ron Dolin, Law School

Apply
Enrollment limited to 24 students. Applications close January 7. Apply here: http://bit.ly/popappwinter2014

Questions
mhagan@dschool.stanford.edu

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Leadership through Flow: Boxing, Dance, and Philosophy

Saturday Workshop
February 1
10:00a – 2:00p
0 Credits

What makes you want to watch a body moving through space? What causes you to align yourself with someone’s vision? Let’s play with learning power and surrender through the body.

This pop-up class will explore philosophy and defining a personal style of leadership through body movement. There are mechanics to the movements of boxing and dance — and to impacting teams as a leader — but there is a deeper foundation to the system of those movements. In boxing, it stems from understanding where power originates in the feet and through the hips. In leadership, it is a framework of values and a paradigm of whom you serve and why. Students will explore how Socratic discussion allows one to find greater flow in boxing and dance, and how learning the foundation of movement allows one to develop a more authentic and effective leadership style.

Teaching Team
Aleta Hayes, Chocolate Heads & Theater and Performance Studies
Anne Gibbon, d.school

Apply
Enrollment limited to 35 students. Applications close January 23. Apply here: http://bit.ly/popappwinter2014

Questions
agibbon@dschool.stanford.edu, ahayes1@stanford.edu

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Notebook Neophyte to Whiteboard Warrior

Thursday Evenings
Feb. 13, 20 & 27
7:00p – 9:00p
Studio 1
0 Credits

Do you admire visual notes? Do you swoon over people who can bring their ideas to life with simple sketches?

Wanna be one of them?

Whiteboard Warrior is back by popular demand! In this class, you’ll beef up your skills as a sketcher and visual communicator. By the end of the 3-evening series, you’ll be able to confidently create sketchnotes and share complex ideas visually.

We’ll build your visual vocabulary, practice both recording and graphic facilitating, and help you make your personal note-taking style way more awesome, whether you’re making brilliantly scrappy notes for lectures, conferences, or ideation sessions.

Teaching Team
Molly Wilson, d.school & Sliced Bread Design
Adam Elmaghraby, Institute for the Future

Apply
Enrollment limited to 25 students. Applications close January 23. Apply here: http://bit.ly/popappwinter2014

Questions
molly@dschool.stanford.edu

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The Consumer Mind and Behavior Design

Tuesday & Thursday Evenings
January 28, 30 & February 4, 6
6:00p-9:00p
Concept Car
0 Credits

Want to learn how to leverage consumer psychology in the design of mobile or web products? This course will introduce new theories and research concerning neuroscience and behavioral psychology to examine models for forming user habits. Students who take this course will learn how to use behavior change methodologies to design a customer experience. Emphasis will be placed on empathizing and ideating for a lightweight prototype based on the principles taught in class. Students who attend are strongly encouraged to arrive with an idea for a product or service that changes consumer behavior.

*Prerequisite: Students who participate in this course must have previously completed at least one d.school course.

Teaching Team
Steph Habif, Stanford Calming Technology Lab & d.school
Nir Eyal, NirAndFar.com

Apply
Enrollment limited to 18 students. Applications close January 7. Apply here: http://bit.ly/popappwinter2014

Questions
sehabif@stanford.edu

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Design Thinking Bootcamp: Experiences in Innovation and Design

Fall 2013
Dive Into Design Thinking

Mon/Wed/Fri 1:15p – 3:05p
Studio 2
ME 377
3 – 4 Units
Letter Grade
Launched 2005

Bootcamp is a fast-paced immersive experience in design thinking. You’ll explore the design thinking process in multiple projects, working in diverse teams to solve real world challenges. Tenets of design thinking including being human-centered, prototype-driven, and mindful of process. Topics include design processes, innovation methodologies, need finding, human factors, visualization, rapid prototyping, team dynamics, storytelling, and project leadership. Field work and deep collaboration with teammates are required of all students. Through coaching and guest lectures, you’ll get exposure to the application of design thinking across a broad sample of fields. Students and faculty from areas including business, earth sciences, education, engineering, humanities and sciences, law, and medicine. Limited enrollment.

Apply
Enrollment limited to 48 students. Application is online here. Applications are due on Wednesday, September 18th @ 11:59pm.

Teaching Team
Justin Ferrell, d.school
Adam Selzer, d.school
Ashish Goel, d.school
Taylor Cone, d.school

Questions
bootcamp@dschool.stanford.edu

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Design Thinking Bootcamp: Experiences in Innovation and Design

@Stanford Studio

Fall 2013
Tu / Th 10:00a – 12:00p
Studio 1
ME 247B
4 Units
Credit/No Credit

Re-imagine the Stanford experience for the year 2020. Fall quarter the d.school’s @Stanford Project will mount “@Stanford Studio,” an opportunity for students to design, develop, execute, and iterate immersive prototypes that allow experimentation into many facets of the future student experience. Because of the nature of prototypes and the subject matter, significant time outside of scheduled class meetings will be required. Students will work closely with design mentors, campus stakeholders, and inspiration partners (innovative educators, artists, museums, companies and/or topical experts from beyond Stanford) to create live, testable, learning experiences. Course will involve fast-paced team work and rely on strong, consistent participation and perfect attendance.

Apply
Application will be given out on first day of class. Strong preference will be given to students enrolled in @Stanford in Spring 2013. Class size limited to 20.

Teaching Team
Carissa Carter, d.school
David Kelley, d.school, ME Design, IDEO
Scott Doorley, d.school

Contact
carissa.carter@gmail.com

 

 

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@Stanford Studio

d.school-Open IDEO Partnership: Unlocking Creative Confidence in Young People

Curious about how to nurture creative confidence in young people? Interested in learning about how online innovation platforms can help foster radical collaboration and generate new ideas?

If so, apply to become a part of a Stanford d.school team that will work with OpenIDEO on an upcoming time-bound challenge. OpenIDEO is IDEO’s open innovation platform for social impact. Over the last three years, its 53,000-member global community has participated in 20 design challenges on a range of topics such as improving maternal health in the developing world, revitalizing cities in decline and supporting the spread of local food.

The d.school team will work on a ten-week challenge focusing on how to nurture creative confidence in young people (ages 15-25). Team members will actively participate in the online platform, and lead offline activities that will try to drive traffic to the platform, while simultaneously trying to design solutions to address the challenge. The team of students will work with Sarah Stein Greenberg and Nadia Roumani throughout the duration of the challenge.

Up to three units of independent study credit will be offered to students, depending on the time they can dedicate to the project.  Students will meet one to two times per week, and the meeting schedule will be determined once the team is selected. Download this PDF for additional details on the class.

Apply
Please fill out this form and send your cv to nadia@dschool.stanford.edu with ‘openIDEO’ in the subject header. Deadline is September 20th at 10am PST.  Stanford graduate and undergraduate (juniors and seniors ) encouraged to apply. Consideration will be given to recent d.school alumni on a case by case basis.

Teaching Team
Sarah Stein Greenberg, d.school
Nadia Roumani, d.school

Questions
nadia@dschool.stanford.edu

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d.school-Open IDEO Partnership: Unlocking Creative Confidence in Young People

ReDesigning the Hospital Birth Experience

Four Evening Pop-Up
November 12, 13, 14, 15
5:30p – 7:30p
2 sessions in d.reserve &  2 session at CAPE
0 Credits

Birth is a very unique, intense experience that happens within a finite period of time, usually in a defined space (the labor and delivery room) . Hospital births offer many opportunities for improvement from the parents’ perspective, the clinician’s perspective, and the baby’s perspective. During our class we will research, understand and offer potential solutions for managing hospital resources, improving safety and efficacy, and educating families in order to optimize medical and family-centered goals. Re-imagining post-partum care could also be considered based on needs that are uncovered. Part of the class will be taught at Center for Advanced Pediatric Education (CAPE), where students will have the opportunity to see birth simulations and debrief with obstetrics nurses. In addition, expert speakers, discussion panels, hands-on prototyping and group presentations will help students understand the design thinking process and develop solutions for the needs they uncover.

Apply
Apply here. Applications close October 30. Enrollment limited to 15 students.

Teaching Team
Jules Sherman, Maternal Life, LLC
Dr. William Rhine, Professor of Pediatrics and Medical Director, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital

Questions
julessherman@alumni.stanford.edu

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ReDesigning the Hospital Birth Experience

Heartistry: Design Thinking from an Artist’s Perspective

Three Evening Pop-Up
November 4, 5, 6
6:00p – 8:00p
Studio 1
0 Credits

You can’t get to breakthrough innovation by being safe. Artists are versed in going to vulnerable places in search of meaning, truth, and beauty. This class will approach a design problem from an artist’s perspective and utilize design thinking as a way to enhance the craft, aesthetics, meaning and ability to provoke thought.

Students will make objects using a highly constrained medium in response to a topic area. We will then discuss the artifacts and explore the connection between design thinking and the creative process.

No prior artistic ability is required for the class, but you will need to come prepared to think with your hands and explore objects and challenges in new ways.

Apply
Apply here. Applications close October 21. Enrollment limited to 12 students.

Teaching Team
Carissa Carter, d.school
Scott Witthoft, d.school
Tom Maiorana, Red Cover Studios and Hummus Apparel

Questions
maiorana.tom@gmail.com

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Heartistry: Design Thinking from an Artist’s Perspective

Design Sprints for Startups

One Evening Pop-Up
October 10
6:00p – 9:00p
Studio 2
0 Credits

Interested in a design process that’s aimed at execution in a startup-environment? This pop-up class will walk you through a process with roots at IDEO, Google and the d.school that the design team at Google Ventures has been honing for quick product development-focused sprints with their portfolio companies.

Bring your startup team + your idea. We’ll get you started on applying the design sprint to your big early challenges.

Apply
Apply here. Applications close September 26. Enrollment limited to 24 students.

Teaching Team:
Caroline O’Connor, Google  and d.school
Jake Knapp, Google Ventures

Questions
caroline.j.oconnor@gmail.com

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WhizBang! Toy Invention

Monday & Wednesday Evenings
October 28, 30 & November 4, 6, 11, 13
6:00p – 7:30p
Studio 2
0 Credits

Some of the first tools we used were toys. What makes the difference between an amazing toy and one that gets used once, then tossed? What’s different about how kids play today vs when you grew up? In this course, you’ll learn a brief history of toys, along with an understanding of basic childhood development. You’ll use design thinking to find inspiration, gain empathy, ideate, and then create a new-to-the-world toy!

Apply
Apply here. Applications close October 14. Enrollment limited to 20 students.

Teaching Team
Brendan Boyle, IDEO Toy Lab
Coe Leta Stafford, IDEO
John Cassidy, Klutz Press

Questions
bboyle@ideo.com

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Design Thinking Basic Training

Two Evening Pop-Up
January 22 & January 29
3:15p – 6:15p
d.school Atrium
0 Units

Design Thinking Basic Training is a high-intensity, short-format introduction to fundamentals of design thinking. Students in Basic Training will tackle a real design project using some of the most instrumental design thinking methods that the d.school has pioneered.

Basic Training content and methodology is intended to expose students to fundamental skills they need to succeed not only in d.school courses, but in their other course work as well. The course format is designed to fit into students’ existing schedule rather than require enrollment for the entire quarter. Students must be able to attend both sessions and complete up to two hours of homework outside of class.

Apply
Enrollment limited to 50 students. Applications close January 7.  Apply here: http://bit.ly/popappwinter2014

Teaching Team
Jeremy Utley, d.school
Perry Klebahn, d.school
Thomas Both, d.school
Stacey Gray, d.school

Questions
stacey@dschool.stanford.edu

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Topics in Design Research: d.think outside the d.school

Three Separate Evening Pop-Ups
October 15, 6:00p – 9:00p in Studio 2
November 12, 6:00p – 9:00p in Studio 2
December 3, 6:00p -9:00p in Studio 2
0 Credits

What is “design research”? This pop-up course is all about hearing from – and designing with – folks who engage in design research outside of the d.school. Across three active evening sessions, non-d.school workshop leaders will share their versions of design research and introduce students to new tools for engaging with and informing design practice. Workshop topics will include game design as research, multi-modal analysis, and design research in the context of the social sciences. We’ll make things, advance our skills, and have fun, as well as engage with ‘serious’ theories and methodologies that will be useful across various areas of the arts and sciences.

Apply
Apply here. You must apply separately for each session. Applications for October 15 session close October 1; for November 12 session close October 29; and for December 3 session close November 19. Enrollment limited to 30 students per session. Each session will have 10-15 seats for the wider (non-student) Stanford and Silicon Valley community interested in design research.

Facilitator
Maryanna Rogers, The Tech Museum of Innovation

Guest Starring
Elizabeth Goodman, UC Berkeley
Kevin Walker, Royal College of Art in London
JooYoung Oh & Steve Lee, Ziba

Questions
maryanna@dschool.stanford.edu

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Topics in Design Research: d.think outside the d.school

Designing Empathy Based Organizations

Tuesday Afternoons
October 22, 29 & November 5, 12, 19
3:15p – 5:15p
d.reserve
1 Unit, GSBGEN 555, Pass/Fail

Organizations are often designed for efficiency or optimization of workflow, not for user empathy. How do you design for both? This pop-up class is geared toward the design (or redesign) for empathy-based organizations. It will teach early-stage leaders about the three basic levers they have for organizational design/re-design: organizational culture, organizational structure (informal and formal), and organizational routines. Emphasis will be placed on how to align these levers to facilitate communication and to structure workflows for empathy-based organizations. The class will work with a fast-growing, design-driven startup, which will articulate to students its goals as a business, as well as its challenges in designing the business. Students will interview and observe multiple stakeholders from diverse teams and use design thinking to address uncovered needs and insights with respect to organizational design.

Apply
Apply here. Applications close September 25. Enrollment Limited to 24 students.

Teaching Team
Chris Flink, IDEO and d.school
Justin Ferrell, d.school
Mike Volpi, GSB and Index Ventures
Sarah Soule, GSB

Questions
justin@dschool.stanford.edu

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Chocolate Heads-Space

Weekend Pop-Up
October 12
10:00a – 4:00p
Studio 2
0 Credits

This Pop-up workshop will launch the Chocolate Head-Space Performance and App Project –for a week-end of brainstorming, prototyping, improvisation and performance making—with interdisciplinary faculty:  human computer interaction, choreography, video: industry professionals: branding and marketing strategists and animators: alongside Chocolate Head performers, designers, geeks, and cross-genre students.

Under the theme of teleportation( quantum mechanics and pop- sci) the workshop would explore 4 main areas: 1.) Low stakes guided improvisational exercises to create Chocolate Heads performance content and imagery. What makes YOU a Chocolate Head?; 2.) Prototyping apps in teams; 3.) Branding and marketing ideation for playground Stanford 4.) Storytelling through video, motion and music.

We seek Students who would be a part of synthesizing and extending the energy, excitement and enhanced sense of common purpose of the Chocolate Heads to the wider Stanford community.

Apply
Apply here. Applications close September 28. Enrollment limited.

Teaching Team
Aleta Hayes, Chocolate Heads, Theater and Performance Studies
Daniel Stringer, Stanford Learning Sciences and Technology Design
Eric Kuziol, Video Artist at Stanford
Guthrie Dolin, Odopod and d.school
Wendy Ju, Center for Design Research

Questions
ahayes1@stanford.edu

About The Chocolate Heads 
The Chocolate Heads are a collective of student dancers, musicians, designers, digital and spoken word artists from all different backgrounds and trainings.  2013-14 The Chocolate Heads will not only create signature dance and music experiences to be performed live, but will also layer a collaborative crowd-sourced based creative canvas onto the Stanford campus through digital media (mobile phones) and an app—the Chocolate Head-Space.

There is seeing space, and there is seeing the Chocolate Head-Space: a unique artistic vision that sees both the potential for interaction and performance. Much like photographers look at the world through a different lens than most of us, recognizing different patterns and focusing on different attributes of the world, Chocolate Heads see the potential for interaction and performance as they look through the view finder of the Chocolate Head-Space.

Content is created every time someone chooses to participate, and with enough participation the entire campus would be riddled with data-based echoes of creative ingenuity.

Here’s a summary of Chocolate Heads 2012-that performed at the Bing Concert Hall during its inaugural season under the theme of Synesthesia.

Here is our TEDX Stanford 2012: http://tedx.stanford.edu/2012/performers/aleta-hayes/

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Design Your Startup

Tuesday Evenings
October 8, 15, 22, 29 & November 5, 6
6:00p – 8:00p
d.reserve
Applications close September 25
0 Credits

Do you have a great idea? Do you want to start a company? Do you wonder what it takes to be a great entrepreneur? Over the pop-up course, we will cover six different topics, each with an expert topical speaker, to help you answer those questions and more. These six classes combined with Zana’s online offering will help you create a business around your idea. At the end of the class, you will have a working pitch and know if startups are right for you.

Apply
Apply here. Enrollment limited to 30 students.

Teaching Team
Ian McFarland, Zana
Jim Scheinman, Maven Ventures Labs
Shea Tate-Di Donna, Zana

Questions
shea@zana.io

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