What will I learn?

Overview

Work with an interdisciplinary group to explore how human centered design (and emerging technologies) could help curb illegal fishing while addressing its environmental and social consequences.

Tuna and shrimp are among the top three consumed seafood products in the US. A look behind the supply chains for these products and other seafood reveals a shadowy world of illicit activity ranging from illegal fishing to human rights abuses. Fish stocks around the world are in decline due, in part, to the widespread practice of illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) fishing. IUU fishing can have a range of environmental and social consequences, including negative impacts on fish populations, loss of economic revenues, threats to livelihoods, and increased vulnerability to labor abuse.

Join our multidisciplinary teaching team—comprised of experts actively working on IUU fishing and forced labor—as we navigate the challenges and opportunities within this highly complex environmental issue. Together we will leverage knowledge in science, human rights, law, and emerging technology, while building empathy to inform actionable solutions.

Learn With

Teaching Team

Eric Hartge

Research Development Manager, Stanford Center for Ocean Solutions

Jessie Brunner

Senior Program Manager, Center for Human Rights and International Justice

Emily Kelly

Hoffmann Fellow, Stanford Center for Ocean Solutions and World Economic Forum Centre for the Fourth Industrial Revolution

Kevin Chand

Lecturer, International Relations Program, Stanford University, Ocean Design Fellow, Stanford Center for Ocean Solutions

Annie Brett

Hoffmann Fellow, Stanford Center for Ocean Solutions and World Economic Forum Centre for the Fourth Industrial Revolution

FAQs

Any questions?

Who do I contact with questions?

Eric Hartge at ehartge@stanford.edu

Details

  • Winter 2020

  • No Credit

  • Friday January 31, 9am to 4pm

  • Location: World Economic Forum, Centre for the Fourth Industrial Revolution (San Francisco Presidio)

Apply

Apply by November 29th.

Apply here!

Accepting 16 students, with 4 alternates.

Open to Graduate Students, Undergraduate Students, Fellows and Post-Docs, Community Members